DW Teen Blog

Welcome to the Dalton Teen Blog!
Click one of the links below to be taken one of the most recent posts, otherwise feel free to scroll down and see what’s been going on in the teen department.



DW Movies @ the Library

Dalton-Whitfield Library will be hosting movie showings at the library! These movies are free to watch and concessions will be available. Come take part in one of our showtimes or in several.

FamilyMoviessmall

Family Movie Day

Family Movie Day will be hosting movies on the 3rd and 4th Saturdays of the month. The movies will begin at 11:30 a.m. Additional showings may be offered on different days and at different hours. All ages are welcome to participate. Movies will be between G and PG.

For family movie information, please contact 706-876-1390.

TeenMovieNightsmall

Teen Movie Night

Teen Movie Night will be hosting movies once or twice a month on a Friday evening. The movies will begin at 3:00 p.m. 6th grade and up are welcome. Movies will be between G and PG-13. For parents with concerns on ratings, feel free to view the movie with your child!

For teen movie information, please contact 706-876-1390.

Come and enjoy our movie showings and bring your friends!

For more information, including the title of the movie showing, please contact the library at 706-876-1390. Keep checking an eye on the calendar for showtimes or pick up a calendar at the library.

Teen Read Week 2013

This week is Teen Read Week. This week is devoted to encouraging teens to read and gain literacy skills. To help draw teens into the library, we have a few events going on and all teens between 6th and 12th grade are invited! There is no specific time for these events. Just drop by the library and speak to Betsy to find out more information.

  • Scavenger Hunt: Search for some cards related to the clues given and for each one you find, receive one entry in a raffle for the book the hunt is based on. All cards must be found between October 15th and 19th.
  • Hoax Image/Photo: Using a photo the library provides, use a photo editor to make something cool/scary/funny/etc. appear in it. Participating earns you an entry into a raffle for a gift card for a small amount. This can be done at home if you have a program for it and there’s a program that Betsy can show you installed here. You do have to drop by to get the rules though. Entries will be posted on the teen blog.
  • Blind Book Drawing: Choose a book title from a box of titles, read the book and do a brief review to earn an entry into the raffle for the gift card (same as the hoax image). The more books you read/review, the more entries you can get. Reviews may be posted on the teen blog and on boards at the library.
    Note: Titles must be selected between October 15th and 19th. Reviews must be turned in by October 31st. Drawing will be held after that date.

Get the full rules for each event at the library!

Teen Read Week 2013 Flyer

Blind Book Drawing Flyer

Scavenger Hunt Flyer

Hoax Image Flyer

New Teen Books at Dalton

The teen department has some new books that are ready for check out!

  • Monument 14 by Emmy Laybourne.
    See what the book jacket has to say:
  • “Your mother hollers that you’re going to miss the bus. She can see it coming down the street. You don’t stop and hug her and tell her you love her. You don’t thank her for being a good, kind, patient mother. Of course not–you launch yourself down the stairs and make a run for the corner.
    Only, if it’s the last time you’ll ever see your mother, you sort of start to wish you stopped and did those things. Maybe even missed the bus.
    But the bus was barreling down our street, so I ran.
    Fourteen kids. One superstore. A million things that go wrong.
    …Six high school students (some popular, some not), two eighth graders (one a tech genius), and six little kids trapped together in a chain superstore build a refuge for themselves inside. While outside, a series of escalating disasters, beginning with a monster hailstorm and ending with a chemical weapons spill, seems to be tearing the world–as they know it–apart.”

  • The Theory of Everything: A Novel by J. J. Johnson.
    See what the book jacket has to say:
  • “Just because everyone else thinks you should be over doesn’t mean you are.
    Last year, Sarah’s best friend Jamie died in a freak accident. At the time, everyone was sad; now they’re just ready for Sarah to get over it and move on.
    But Sarah can’t move on, because she can’t stop reliving what happened. She’s still wrestling with guilt. She’s questioning the meaning of life. And she misses her best friend. Her grades are plummeting, her relationships are falling apart, and her normal voice seems to have been replaced with a snark box.
    In a last-ditch effort to pull it together, Sarah befriends Jamie’s twin brother Emmett, who may be the only other person who understands what she’s missing. When she gets a job working for the local eccentric, Sarah finally begins to understand the threads that connect us all, the benefit of giving people a chance, and the power of love.”

  • iBoy by Kevin Brooks.
    See what the book jacket has to say:
  • “What can he do with his new powers–and what are they doing to him?
    Before the attack, Tom Harvey was just an average teenager. But a head-on collision with high technology has turned him into an actualized App. Fragments of a shattered iPhone are embedded in his brain. and they’re having an extraordinary effect on his every thought.
    Because now Tom knows, sees, and can do more than any normal boy ever could.
    But with his new powers comes a choice: To avenge Lucy, the girl he loves, will he hunt down the vicious gangsters who hurt her? Will he take the law into his own electric hands and exterminate them from the South London housing projects where, by fear and violence, they rule?
    Not even his mental search engine can predict the shocking outcome of iBoy’s actions.”

  • Croak by Gina Damico.
    See what the book cover has to say:
  • “Sixteen-year-old Lex Bartleby has sucker-punched her last classmate. fed up with her punkish, wild behavior, her parents ship her off to upstate New York to live with her Uncle Mort for the summer, hoping that a few months of dirty farm work will whip her back into shape. But Uncle Mort’s true occupation is much dirtier than shoveling manure.
    He’s a Grim Reaper. And he’s going to teach her the family business.
    Lex quickly assimilates into the peculiar world of Croak, a town populated entirely by reapers who deliver souls from this life to the next. Along with her infuriating yet intriguing partner, Driggs, and a rockstar crew of fellow Grim apprentices, Lex is soon zapping her targets like a natural born Killer.
    Yet her innate ability morphs into an unchecked desire for justice–or is it vengeance?–whenever she’s forced to Kill a murder victim, yearning to stop the attackers before they can strike again. So when people start to die–that is, people who aren’t supposed to be dying, people who have committed grievous crimes against the innocent–Lex’s curiosity is piqued. Her obsession grows as the bodies pile up, and a troubling question begins to swirl through her mind: if she succeeds in tracking down the murderer, will she stop the carnage–or will she ditch Croak and join in?”

  • Will’s Choice by Gail Griffith.
    See what the book cover has to say:
  • “On March 11, 2001, seventeen-year-old Will ingested a near-fatal dose of his antidepressant medication, an event that would forever change his life and the lives of his family. In Will’s Choice, his mother, Gail Griffith, tells the story of her family’s struggle to renew Will’s interest in life and to regain their equilibrium in the aftermath.
    Griffith intersperses her own finely wrought prose with dozens of letters and journal entries from family and friends, including many from Will himself. A memoir with a social conscience, Will’s Choice lays bare the social and political challenges that American families face in combating this most mysterious and stigmatized of illnesses. In Gail Griffith, depressed teens have found themselves a formidable advocate, and in the evocative and fiercely compelling narrative of Will’s Choice, we all discover the promise of a second chance.”

  • My Anxious Mind: A Teen’s guide to Managing Anxiety and Panic by Michael Tompkins and Katherine Martinez, illustrated by Michael Sloan.
    See what the book cover has to say:
  • “Can you spare 30 minutes to feel less anxious?
    Go ahead. Think about how your life would be different if you were less anxious. What would change? Would you try out for the basketball team? Ask someone out on a date? Would you sleep better and feel less tense? Would you feel calmer and happier?
    My Anxious Mind outlines a simple and proven plan to help you understand and deal with your anxiety and panic. It is chock full of simple-to-use tools and strategies that easily fit into any teen’s busy routine.”

New Teen Nonfiction Books

We have two new teen non-fiction books available for check out!

  • The Duct Tape Book: 25 Projects to Make with Duct Tape by Jolie Dobson
    See what the book jacket has to say:
  • “Duct tape is exploding in popularity as an ultimate craft tool, going beyond its history of being a practical, magic fix-all tape. With bold colors and fun patterns on the market, the creative possibilities of duct tape are endless! Everything from prom dresses to artistic shoe repair is possible with this multi-purpose tape. This book contains 25 fascinating, original projects–some useful, all fun to do–that are sure to inspire duct tape artists everywhere. Easy-to-follow instructions and color photographs combine to guide anyone to produce unique and useful duct tape projects, including:

    • Bike buddy: Customize your ride with a practical pannier
    • Smart phone holder: Encased in decoration
    • Hot-pink handbag: A fashionable carry-all
    • This little piggy bank: Stick your money away
    • Passport pal and wallet: Personalized ID holder
    • Fab frames: Reframe your memories
    • Look great in tape: Sassy skirt; Cheeky Chaps; Wild wild vest
    • Plus many more seasonal projects and decorations.

    Arm yourself with a few rolls, tools, and some basic moves, join the fun and master the sticky stuff to be part of one of the most exciting and creative trends of the decade!”

  • The Rose that Grew from Concrete by Tupac Amaru Shakur
    See what the book jacket has to say:
  • Tupac Shakur’s most intimate and honest thoughts were uncovered only after his death with The Rose that Grew from Concrete, a collection of deeply personal poetry handwritten by Tupac in his own private notebooks over the course of his life–a mirror into his enigmatic world and its many contradictions written from the time he was nineteen.
    A complex life cycle encapsulated in seventy-two brief poems, The Rose that Grew from Concrete has become a legitimate modern classic and a touchstone for aspiring artists the world over. It is also the purest reflection of Tupac’s spirit, his energy–and his ultimate message of hope.”
    “‘In the Event of My Demise’
    Dedicated 2 those curious
    In the event of my Demise
    when my heart can beat no more
    I Hope I Die For a Principle
    or A Blieft that I had lived 4
    I will die Before my Time
    Because I feel the shadow’s Depth
    so much I wanted 2 accomplish
    Before I reached my Death
    I have come 2 grips with the possibility
    and wiped the last tear from my eyes
    I Loved All who were Positive
    In the event of my Demise!”

Another nonfiction title will be available starting the second week of October.
My Anxious Mind: A Teen’s guide to Managing Anxiety and Panic by Michael A. Tompkins and Katherine Martinez.
See what the back has to say:

“Can you spare 30 minutes to feel less anxious? Go ahead. Think about how your life would be different if you were less anxious. What would change? Would you try out for the basketball team? Ask someone out on a date? Would you sleep better and feel less tense? Would you feel calmer and happier? My Anxious Mind outlines a simple and proven plan to help you understand and deal with your anxiety and panic. It is chock full of simple-to-use tools and strategies that easily fit into any teen’s busy routine.”

Teen Advisory Group

AreYouReady

We’re ready to listen to you!

The library’s starting a Teen Advisory Group and if you’re in 6-12th grade, you’re invited! Come speak up and tell us how to make the library better for you while earning volunteer hours, gaining new skills, winning prizes, and making new friends.

What Do I Get To Do
PostIts

Interested teens should contact Betsy by emailing powellb@ngrl.org, calling (706) 876-1365, or messaging the Dalton-Whitfield Facebook Page for more information.

Chalk Art

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The Dalton-Whitfield Teens made some awesome chalk graffiti on the library sidewalks as part of the August 2013 Summer Reading Program. This was our finale and we had 8 kids doing art. See the gallery below to see what they did. Click on an image to see the full picture.